Educational Philosophy

The “learning process” is both the acquisition of knowledge in the form of understanding information as well as adaptation of skills. The “teaching process” is the method for promoting learning. One who masters this art is a teacher.

I have taught a variety of medical and life science subjects including physiology, nutrition, biology, pharmacology, pathology and dermatology. With a M.D. and Ph.D., I have twelve years of international teaching experience in many countries including Singapore, U.K. and ten years in the United States. I embarked on my fourth degree in medical educational leadership that has strengthened my teaching skills and hone my leadership qualities as an educator. I have delivered formal lectures, led lab sessions, served as a facilitator in problem-based learning groups, and taught medical students and nurses in outpatient clinics.  I value teaching and enjoy my interaction with students and colleagues. With my colleagues, I share effective teaching and learning strategies that cater to the millennial learners in modern medical education.

In my opinion, for a course, setting realistic teaching goals that allow active engagement and yet understand challenges in learning is the key to success. I was inspired by a video, “my private universe” and realized that teachers can fail to evaluate teaching concepts they have instilled in their students, or could unintentionally fail to change those incorrect concepts engraved so deeply. These stories inspire me to use critical thinking cases in my basic and clinical science classes.

I undertook a teacher’s training program and was amazed to observe how one of the computer science teaching assistants used props in the shape of cut cardboards to demonstrate the concept of recursive programming to a group of medicine and biology graduates. To check student comprehension and encourage peer learning, I am taking the approach to style my open lectures by introducing concept tests and evaluations, otherwise 50 minutes of lecture is only or “in effect” 15 minutes of teaching. In small group or problem-based learning, students facilitate each other’s learning by working or critically appreciating a clinical problem. Similarly, the “integrated visual learning system” is a very useful tool to facilitate student learning, where lectures, articles, quizzes could be projected on the web in support of newer learning models like “flipped classroom”. I am fortunate that my clinical background helps me effectively facilitate problem-based learning sessions.

Students may provoke fear and anxiety of performing below par, and thus it becomes imperative to help them avoid temptations such as plagiarism, and cheating. To counteract this issue and to maintain their interest in the topic, I periodically check their progress and resolve their concerns during the course. Another challenge in teaching large classes is helping students understand the importance of active engagement and class participation that facilitates lifelong learning. Some ways I prompt participation is to administer an activity such as ask students to write short in-class minute papers, attempt analytical multiple choice questions or critically appreciate a clinical vignette. I weigh my grading appropriately giving students a fair chance to pass a challenging course.

Because I believe in being responsive to my students’ learning, I continuously collect feedback from students throughout the semester. This feedback takes the form of surveys or questionnaires that I collect during the course. Recently I have started creating targeted videos on basic science concepts that students find difficult to understand. A typical question might be “What’s one thing I could do differently to improve your learning?” and “What’s one thing you could do differently to improve your learning?”

My educational goals and philosophy is strengthened by my teaching experience and I take great pride and responsibility when it comes to student learning. The best reflection on the success of my modern education strategies is my excellent teaching evaluations and awards that drives my passion to continue to learn and grow in my profession.

The “learning process” is both the acquisition of knowledge in the form of understanding information as well as adaptation of skills. The “teaching process” is the method for promoting learning. One who masters this art is a teacher.

I have taught a variety of medical and life science subjects including physiology, nutrition, biology, pharmacology, pathology and dermatology. With a M.D. and Ph.D., I have twelve years of international teaching experience in many countries including Singapore, U.K. and ten years in the United States. I embarked on my fourth degree in medical educational leadership that has strengthened my teaching skills and hone my leadership qualities as an educator. I have delivered formal lectures, led lab sessions, served as a facilitator in problem-based learning groups, and taught medical students and nurses in outpatient clinics.  I value teaching and enjoy my interaction with students and colleagues. With my colleagues, I share effective teaching and learning strategies that cater to the millennial learners in modern medical education.In my opinion, for a course, setting realistic teaching goals that allow active engagement and yet understand challenges in learning is the key to success. I was inspired by a video, “my private universe” and realized that teachers can fail to evaluate teaching concepts they have instilled in their students, or could unintentionally fail to change those incorrect concepts engraved so deeply. These stories inspire me to use critical thinking cases in my basic and clinical science classes.

In my opinion, for a course, setting realistic teaching goals that allow active engagement and yet understand challenges in learning is the key to success. I was inspired by a video, “my private universe” and realized that teachers can fail to evaluate teaching concepts they have instilled in their students, or could unintentionally fail to change those incorrect concepts engraved so deeply. These stories inspire me to use critical thinking cases in my basic and clinical science classes.

I undertook a teacher’s training program and was amazed to observe how one of the computer science teaching assistants used props in the shape of cut cardboards to demonstrate the concept of recursive programming to a group of medicine and biology graduates. To check student comprehension and encourage peer learning, I am taking the approach to style my open lectures by introducing concept tests and evaluations, otherwise 50 minutes of lecture is only or “in effect” 15 minutes of teaching. In small group or problem-based learning, students facilitate each other’s learning by working or critically appreciating a clinical problem. Similarly, the “integrated visual learning system” is a very useful tool to facilitate student learning, where lectures, articles, quizzes could be projected on the web in support of newer learning models like “flipped classroom”. I am fortunate that my clinical background helps me effectively facilitate problem-based learning sessions.

Students may provoke fear and anxiety of performing below par, and thus it becomes imperative to help them avoid temptations such as plagiarism, and cheating. To counteract this issue and to maintain their interest in the topic, I periodically check their progress and resolve their concerns during the course. Another challenge in teaching large classes is helping students understand the importance of active engagement and class participation that facilitates lifelong learning. Some ways I prompt participation is to administer an activity such as ask students to write short in-class minute papers, attempt analytical multiple choice questions or critically appreciate a clinical vignette. I weigh my grading appropriately giving students a fair chance to pass a challenging course.

Because I believe in being responsive to my students’ learning, I continuously collect feedback from students throughout the semester. This feedback takes the form of surveys or questionnaires that I collect during the course. Recently I have started creating targeted videos on basic science concepts that students find difficult to understand. A typical question might be “What’s one thing I could do differently to improve your learning?” and “What’s one thing you could do differently to improve your learning?”

My educational goals and philosophy is strengthened by my teaching experience and I take great pride and responsibility when it comes to student learning. The best reflection on the success of my modern education strategies is my excellent teaching evaluations and awards that drives my passion to continue to learn and grow in my profession.